SAM Seminar 10: Intellectual property and the creative industries today.

When:13 Aug 2013, 4:30pm - 6pm
Venue:Robert Webster Building, Room 327
Who:Panel Discussion

Panel: Intellectual Property and the Creative Industries Today

Chris Chow : MD of Chris Chow Creative Lawyers
Troy Lum : MD of Hopscotch Films
Kathy Bowrey : Faculty of Law, UNSW

Creative Deals in the Creative Industries: What rights should I control in this digital age?

Chris Chow is Managing Director of Chris Chow Creative Lawyers. He specialises in advising musicians, producers, actors, content creators, directors, designers and others in the entertainment and creative industries.

His presentation explores how new ways are being developed for the owners of intellectual property to commercialise their rights within the entertainment industries. By being creative with the way deals are structured, rights in intellectual property can be separated and licensed independently to maximise profitability and control.

Changing consumption patterns and alternate distribution models

Troy Lum was the head of distribution company Dendy Films from 1998-2002. In May 2002, alongside Frank Cox and Sandie Don, Troy launched Hopscotch Films, which went on to become Australia’s leading independent distributor. With Troy at the helm, Hopscotch releases have included hits such as Fahrenheit 9/11, Pan’s Labyrinth, The Wrestler, Mao’s Last Dancer, Midnight in Paris, A Separation, The Sapphires and Rust and Bone.

His presentation will be focused on the changing behavioural patterns of consumers of entertainment and the technological changes that facilitating this –discussing alternate distribution models, and how these are changing the way content is being made and the kind of content being made.

The ALRC Copyright Inquiry: who is invested in what? Is there really a war between content and technology makers?

Professor Kathy Bowrey teaches in the Faculty of Law, UNSW. Her expertise primarily relates to intellectual property history, theory, culture and practice. She is currently a member of the ALRC Copyright Inquiry Advisory Committee. The ALRC report is due in late 2013.

Her presentation discusses a number of issues currently under the spotlight in the Australian Law Reform Commission (ALRC) Copyright and the Digital Economy Inquiry. Why is the current law perceived as being too restrictive? What are creators, investors, distributors and users saying that they want changed? Why don’t we have a fair use right or a fair dealing right for transformative works? Why do many from the GLAM (Galleries, Libraries, Art Galleries and Museums) sector support copyright reform and what is it that they want reformed? What is the ALRC likely to recommend?

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